Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada
Symbol of the Government of Canada

Common menu bar links

Subatomic Physics Major Resources Support Program Frequently Asked Questions

The NSERC Subatomic Physics Major Resources Support (SAP-MRS) Program is accepting new applications for review by the Subatomic Physics Evaluation Section.

Program

1. I am an individual researcher from a Canadian institution and I carry out research in subatomic physics. I want to use a unique national resource based in Canada. Does the SAP-MRS Program directly assist individual researchers in paying for the use of such resources?

No, the SAP-MRS Program does not directly assist individual researchers in paying for the use of national resources within the field of subatomic physics, located in Canada. Rather, the SAP-MRS Program contributes to the operating and maintenance costs of such resources in order to facilitate their use by researchers.

2. I am an individual researcher from a Canadian institution and I carry out research in subatomic physics. I want to use a major resource based outside Canada. Does the SAP-MRS Program directly assist individual researchers in paying for the use of such resources?

The SAP-MRS Program aims to assist Canadian subatomic physics researchers in accessing major resources located abroad, the equivalent of which is not available in Canada. This support is not, however, given to individual researchers but to national user consortia or collaborations. The consortia must be composed of researchers from several institutions (including universities or national laboratories) across Canada. Moreover, the consortia must be composed of researchers from more than one research project/program, the objective being to enable effective access to a large Canadian user base. Access to a major resource located abroad by a single project/program should be supported through the grant supporting the activities of that project/program.

Support to access major resources located abroad excludes any direct contribution towards the operating and maintenance costs of those resources.

3. A team of specialized engineers and technicians in our department supports the subatomic physics research activities of several major projects, with users from across Canada. Is it necessary for our resource to expand and establish nodes in several other universities across Canada, with an overarching organizational structure, in order to be considered national in scope?

No, this is not necessary. What define a resource are its user base and its accessibility to the subatomic physics community at large. Any resource must provide support to members of the community beyond one institution or a region, as well as beyond a single project or collaborator.

4. Our team of specialized engineers and technicians, located in University A, provides support that is complementary to that offered by a specialized technical team in University B. Can we establish a single resource with two coordinated nodes, one in University A and the other one in University B, and submit a single grant application?

Yes, this is possible. A resource can have multiple nodes (locations). This is not different from major collaborations that have research groups in numerous institutions across Canada. Their coordinated research activities are typically supported through one Subatomic Physics Discovery Project grant.

Application

5. Can I submit a grant application without first submitting a Notification of Intent to Apply for a Subatomic Physics Major Resources Support Grant?

No. A Notification of Intent to Apply for a Subatomic Physics Major Resources Support Grant must first be submitted by any applicant intending to apply to the Program. Full applications cannot be submitted if a Notification of Intent to Apply has not been submitted by the deadline date.

6. Can I submit the Notification of Intent to Apply or the application for a SAP-MRS grant other than through NSERC’s Research Portal?

No. The Notification of Intent to Apply and the application must be submitted through NSERC’s Research Portal.

7. What is the difference between a co-applicant and a major user?

All co-applicants are major users of the resource, but not all major users are co-applicants. NSERC suggests that some co-applicants be drawn from the management team of the resource. It is important to note that all co-applicants must be eligible for NSERC funding. Refer to NSERC’s Eligibility Criteria. The application must include the This link will take you to another Web site Canadian Common CV (CCV) of each of the co-applicants. The group of co-applicants can be a subset of the major users. Information regarding major users can be provided in the full application. The layout of the application, the use of the available space, and the choice of researchers to include as co-applicants are left to the discretion of the applicant.

8. What is the typical number of co-applicants?

There is no typical number of co-applicants for a SAP-MRS application. However, the maximum number of co-applicants is 10. NSERC recognizes that not all resources are the same and that the profile of applicants and co-applicants will vary accordingly.

9. Are co-applicants necessary, or can the application refer to major users without having any actual co-applicants?

The layout of the application, the use of the available space, and the choice of researchers to include as co-applicants are left to the discretion of the applicant. However, without co-applicants and their CCV, the Subatomic Physics Evaluation Section could have some difficulty in assessing the excellence of the users and the national or international scope of the resource.

10. What if a significant major user is not eligible for NSERC funding?

An applicant may list the major users who are not eligible for NSERC funding but who are important to the merit of the proposal as collaborators. Collaborators, and any other users, may be listed within the maximum number of free-form pages allowed to describe the proposal and address the selection criteria in the application.

11. What is a collaborator?

A collaborator is a major user who is expected to contribute to the overall intellectual and scientific direction of the resource’s activities and research programs. Collaborators must be qualified to undertake research independently. Collaborators do not have access to NSERC grant funds. Examples of collaborators are government scientists, company personnel or research scientists from other countries. There is no typical number of collaborators and no limit on this number. Collaborators may be listed within the maximum number of free-form pages allowed to describe the proposal and address the selection criteria in the application.